City of Trees Challenge Information

Why Now - Why Us

Boise’s nickname is the City of Trees, named when settlers summited a hill, looked down into the Treasure Valley and were astounded by the vast river forest. We’re making a commitment to continue that legacy. But we realize we can’t do this alone, that’s where you come in. Here’s the deal, we’ll make a commitment to plant trees in parks and on city property, we’re looking for you, our citizens and community partners, to site and plant new trees as well.

If successful, this will be a movement sparked by our humble City of Trees that grows into something much larger. In these challenging, highly politicized times, trees are something that we can all agree on. With your help our city will be greener and we’ll inspire many cities to become a city of trees.

The Partners

The City of Trees Challenge is led by the Boise Parks and Recreation Department, in collaboration with: City Council President, Elaine Clegg; the Treasure Valley Canopy Network and Public Works Department. The City of Boise will take the lead by planting trees in parks, along streets and on city owned property and will create a platform that informs and engages people city-wide. The City will partner with local business and the green industry as well as state, regional, national and international partners, such as The Nature Conservancy Arbor Day Foundation and American Forests.  The City of Trees Challenge will leave a lasting impact on the health of Boise’s environment, our community and our regional economy. 

In addition to what is happening in Boise, the City of Trees Challenge will ask communities across Idaho and the World to join us. Together we can build healthier communities and create a significant impact on the global climate crisis.

Recovery and Resiliency

The COVID-19 worldwide pandemic impact on our local community and the world’s health and economic future has been swift and deep. Long before these times, we were aware of the local and global climate impacts of our growing population and carbon emissions. Most of us intrinsically knew the value of trees in our neighborhoods and locally. As we have spent more time near our homes many have come to value our tree canopy and it benefits to our neighborhoods even more. Recovery may not be as swift as the onset of the health emergency; we think planting trees can provide a pathway to it making it long lasting and deep.

Message Sent Successfully!

Message Failed To Send.

Send a Message to Parks and Rec