Governor Edward J. Curtis

Photo courtesy of svguide.com/s02/s02riot.htm

Born 1827, Worchester, Massachusetts
Died December 31, 1895, Boise, Idaho
(Unmarked, S of son)

Although never appointed or elected governor of Idaho Territory, Edward J. Curtis filled the office of territorial governor more years than any other man. Of the 16 men who were appointed to the office by various U.S. presidents, four never came to the territory, one came and stayed a week and two others served less than a year.  Many others did not arrive in the territory until months after receiving their appointments.

Curtis, appointed Idaho's first territorial secretary in 1869 by President Grant, became acting governor each time a vacancy occurred. He was reappointed
Secretary in 1885 by President Arthur and again in 1889 by President Harrison, serving until state officers were elected in Nov. 1890.  He was Adjutant General of Idaho for the first three years of statehood.

Curtis graduated from Princeton College in 1848 and migrated to California the same year.  He served in California and Oregon legislatures, and established a law office in Virginia City, Nevada, before moving to Idaho.

After traveling to Washington, D.C., and securing an appropriation of $5,000.00, Curtis founded the Idaho Law Library.

Curtis's funeral, under the auspices of the I.O.O.F., was attended by a hundred lodge members, the Ada County Bar Association and the Zouaves, a military drill unit.

Curtis married Susan L. Frost in 1856, in Sacramento, CA. They were the parents of four children.

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